GET HELP

** If you are having thoughts of harming yourself or your baby, please seek immediate medical attention. Call 911 or drive yourself to your nearest emergency department and leave your baby in the care of a loved one. **

Screen Shot 2019-09-05 at 4.39.47 PMTo find out more about what resources are available where you live, find a Postpartum Support International Coordinator here: https://www.postpartum.net/get-help/locations/ or text them at 503-894-9453.

Though we’re still lacking proper health care for women dealing with a potential maternal mental illness, here’s what you can do to get help in the meantime:

1. TALK TO SOMEONE YOU TRUST

Disobedient Boy And Worried Mother During Therapy For Kid With AdhdIf you think you may have a maternal mental illness, or if you’re just feeling off and not sure what’s happening to you, don’t keep your feelings to yourself. Tell someone you trust like your partner or a friend. Since universal screening doesn’t exist currently, (but kudos to the health care providers who are doing it anyway!) the onus is on moms to notice that something doesn’t feel right and when you’re a new mother dealing with sleepless nights and caring for a new baby, it’s hard to distinguish whether you’re suffering from a maternal mental illness or just adjusting to new motherhood. There is a difference and while both situations deserve attention and help, one is a result of a physical, biological illness that requires medical attention and treatment.

2. MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO SEE YOUR FAMILY DOCTOR / PRIMARY HEALTH CARE PROVIDER

While your partner or your friend may be amazingly supportive and give you all kinds of advice, they are not medical professionals so the next thing to do is to make an appointment to see your family doctor / primary health care provider.

Hopefully, they will properly assess you (perhaps using the Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale, which, take note, doesn’t properly address postpartum anxiety which is more prevalent than postpartum depression).

Doctor Consulting Patient About Right Medication. Physician Holding Medicine And Pills In Hand. PharIf you’re diagnosed with a maternal mental illness such as postpartum depression or anxiety, you may be prescribed medication and/or therapy. Your doctor may refer you to a psychiatrist that specializes in maternal mental health.

There may be a wait list and they may ask if you can afford to pay for a private psychotherapist.

Some hospitals have perinatal mental health programs your doctor can refer you but these are mostly found in urban areas.

** And if your health care provider isn’t taking you seriously, switch to another one! **

3. FIND OTHER MOMS THAT GET IT

If there’s a maternal mental health support group in your area or online, join it! Make sure to join my 24/7 Postpartum Depression & Anxiety Facebook Support Group with thousands of women from around the world experiencing varying degrees of maternal mental illness. I started the group back when I was diagnosed and couldn’t find anyone to talk to at 3 am. It’s a private, closed group with no judgment and no advertising or selling whatsoever. I also host a regular live Q&A chat with maternal mental health experts so it’s a great place to be!